CAMERA AS CULTURAL CRITIQUE

May 24, 2016 § Leave a comment

CameraasCulturalCritique

In this conference we investigate the potential of visual media to convey and respond to existing as well as emerging social realities. We aim to contribute to an interdisciplinary field of research and practice that includes anthropology, philosophy and visual art. The visual media we wish to discuss range from photography and film to digital media, audio-visual installations and exhibitions.

CAMERA AS CULTURAL CRITQUE – Juxtaposition, Intervention and Co-Creation

International Conference

Aarhus University & Moesgaard Museum (Denmark)

25-27 May 2016

Speakers include Trinh T. Minh-ha, Andrew Irving, Christian Suhr, Jennifer Deger, Catherine Russell, Jane Jin Kaisen, Mark Curran, Ton Otto, Karen Waltorp and Peter Crawford

Full details available here.

The conference is organised by the research group Camera as Cultural Critique based at the Eye & Mind Laboratory for Visual Anthropology at Aarhus University and Moesgaard Museum. This four-year research initiative (2013-2016) investigates the potential of using visual technologies and methodologies in social science research in practice. We collaborate with a variety of international researchers and practitioners, with the aim of establishing visual anthropology as a distinct form of critique within anthropology and the social sciences in general.

ARTIST TALK (Berlin)

May 4, 2016 § Leave a comment

 

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Mark Curran / THE MARKET

As part of a series of events organised by Peggy Sue Amison (Curator & Artistic Director, East Wing), Irish Artist, Mark Curran will giving a talk on his research project on the functioning and condition of the global markets, THE MARKET, next Monday, May 9th at tête (artist-run project space). All begins at 7.30.

Irish Artist, Mark Curran will talk about his current ongoing transnational project, THE MARKET, which continues a cycle to date, and focuses on the functioning and condition of the global markets. It has been supported by Arts Council of Ireland & curated by Helen Carey. Future installations are confirmed for the UK & France in 2016/17 and a full publication is also planned.

Full details available here (tête) & here (Photography in Berlin).

The Economy of Appearances – Installation (Film)

March 25, 2016 § Leave a comment

‘In Mark Curran’s practice, projects unfold over time. (Since the late nineties) Curran has undertaken a cycle of long-term, ethnographically-informed multimedia research projects addressing the predatory context resulting from migrations and flows of global capital…in this major exhibition, The Economy of Appearances, Curran draws these projects together for the first time, expanding the enquiry with newly commissioned work completed in Amsterdam. Incorporating photographs, film, sound, artifactual material and testimony, themes include algorithmic machinery of financial markets, as innovator of this technology, absorption of crises as normalisation of deviance, and long range mapping and consequences of financial activity distanced from citizens and everyday life’ Helen Carey

from Installation at Limerick City Gallery of Art (Autumn 2015)

Filming Isabella Walsh
Editing Isabella Walsh & Mark Curran

Thanks to Arts Council Ireland, Noorderlicht Photography, NEPN (University of Sunderland), Institute of Art, Design & Technology (IADT), Belfast Exposed Photography Gallery, Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Gallery of Photography & Culture Ireland

Full information here (e-flux).

Installation images here.

PERSPECTIVES: Lewis Glucksman Gallery (Talk)

February 24, 2016 § Leave a comment

How does the marketplace affect our everyday lives? What happens as goods proceed from the factory floor to the trading floor and what role does the economy play in contemporary society? This series of Perspectives asks invited experts to address current economic questions both within Ireland and internationally.

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On invitation of Chris Clarke, senior curator at the Lewis Glucksman Gallery in Cork (Ireland), Mark Curran will be speaking on Wednesday, February 24th about the project, THE MARKET.

It is in the context of the current show Chris has curated in collaboration with Declan Jordan, lecturer in economics at University College Cork (UCC), titled EVERYTHING MUST GO. The group exhibition addresses the role of art and the market.

Full details here.

 

PERIODICAL REVIEW #5

December 12, 2015 § Leave a comment

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Periodical Review #5—Pallas Projects & NCAD Gallery

Rachael Campbell-Palmer, Liam Crichton, Mark Curran, Cian Donnelly, Caroline Doolin, Brian Duggan, Gabhann Dunne, Glenn Fitzgerald, Gemma Fitzpatrick, Timothy Furey, Eileen Gray, Seán Grimes, Siobhán Hapaska, Jacqueline Holt, Kevin Lindsay, Eilis McDonald, Lucy McKenna, Eva Rothschild, Gary Shaw

Selected by Anne Kelly, Daniel Jewesbury, Gavin Murphy & Mark Cullen

Preview
6–8pm, Friday 11th December 2015

Gallery hours
Please see gallery websites for hours and Christmas closing

An artwork, like a book, is not made up of individual words on a page each of which with a meaning, but is instead “caught up in a system of references to other books, other texts, other sentences” †

Not a group exhibition per se, Periodical Review is a discursive action, with the gallery as a magazine-like layout of images that speak (the field talking to itself). This is the exhibition as resource, in which we invite agents within the field to engage with what were for them significant moments, practices, works, activity, objects: nodes within the network.

Periodical Review is an annual survey of recent Irish art, selected in collaboration with invited curators/peers from around Ireland. Each year, Pallas Projects invite two peers – artists, writers, educators, curators – to review and subsequently nominate a number of art practices, selected via an editorial meeting. Such a review-type exhibition within Irish art practice acts to revisit; to be a reminder, a critical appraisal and consolidation of ideas and knowledge; to facilitate and encourage collaboration, crossover and debate.

In looking at self-organized exhibitions, off-site projects, commercial gallery and museum shows, Periodical Review looks to share a spectrum of practices, creating dialogue and critical reflection to help develop and support Irish contemporary art as a whole; and to act as an accessible survey of contemporary art for a wider audience, expanding the experience of art practices from around the country.

Daniel Jewesbury (b. London, 1972) studied Fine Art at NCAD and moved to Belfast in 1996, where he’s worked as an artist, writer, editor and curator ever since. Daniel was a co-editor of Variant from 2000 to 2012, was a prolific contributor to Belfast’s satirical newspaper The Vacuum, and has been published in journals including Third Text, the Edinburgh Review and Art & Research. He is currently researching the relationships between death and desire in the modern city, for a major exhibition he is curating in 2016. Daniel is employed as a Lecturer in Film Studies at the University of Ulster.

Anne Kelly is Programme Curator at the NCAD Gallery, National College of Art and Design, Dublin (2011–). She has previously worked independently as a curator, artist, educator and arts manager on a wide range of exhibitions, projects and live events; and has also held positions at Kerlin Gallery, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, Sculptors Society of Ireland, Trinity College Dublin and Dublin City University, all Dublin. She is the recipient of Arts Council of Ireland, and CREATE: National Development Agency for Collaborative Arts and County Council awards. Kelly is an NCAD Fine Art graduate and earned an MSc in Computer Science, Trinity College Dublin.

Previous co-curators of Periodical Review: Mary Conlon (Ormston House) & Paul Hallahan (artist & independent curator); Matt Packer (Glucksman/Treignac/CCA) & Michele Horrigan (Askeaton Contemporary Arts); Eamonn Maxwell (Director, Lismore Castle Arts) & Padraic E. Moore (Independent curator), Ruth Carroll (RHA) & Carl Giffney (Good Hatchery).

† Michel Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge

Further information NCAD Gallery & Pallas Projects.

Periodical Review #5 is an initiative of Pallas Projects in collaboration with NCAD Gallery. Pallas Projects 2015 programme is supported by Dublin City Council

Dedicated to editor, educator, art writer, colleague & friend, Jason Oakley (1968-2015)

Mediating Precariousness

November 12, 2015 § Leave a comment

Global Capitalism and the Challenge of Well-Being in the World
is theme of this year’s SEG (Swiss Ethnological Association) annual international conference being held at
Institute of Social Anthropology
University of Bern, Switzerland
from Thursday to Saturday, November 12-14 2015.

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Mark Curran has been invited to present as part of the panel: ‘Mediating Precariousness: Creative Ethnographic Practices in an Era of Crisis’ along with speakers Darcy Alexander, Andrew Irving and Claire Vionnet. The panel have been invited by the media anthropologist, Prof. Dr. Michaela Schäuble (University of Bern).

Full details are available here.

The Economy of Appearances @ LCGA (Installation)

October 1, 2015 § Leave a comment

1_LCGA_Curran

In this major exhibition, The Economy of Appearances, Curran draws these projects together for the first time, expanding the enquiry with newly commissioned work completed in Amsterdam. Incorporating photographs, film, sound, artifactual material and testimony, themes include algorithmic machinery of financial markets, as innovator of this technology, absorption of crises as normalisation of deviance, and long range mapping and consequences of financial activity distanced from citizens and everyday life.
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6A_LCGA_Curran

Curran filmed in the new financial district of Zuidas on the southern periphery of the Dutch capital – a global centre for algorithmic trading. Adapted from a text by former trader and now financial activist, Brett Scott, which examines High Frequency Trading (HFT) and how the input of human values, are excluded, the voiceover and title of the film are inspired by Scott’s essay, Algorithmic Surrealism. The film suggests the hegemony of HFT and the extinction of human reason or intelligence – human strengths that also include traits such as empathy and ethical behaviour – in Market decisions will both perpetuate and render more extreme the power relations of minority wealth in globalised capitalist systems

7_LCGA_Curran

Through the application of an algorithm identifying the words “market” and/or “markets” in public speeches by relevant national Ministers of Finance, the data is then transformed to create the installation soundscape. To date, algorithmic translations of Michael Noonan (Ireland), George Osborne (United Kingdom), Pierre Moscovici (France) and Jeroen Dijsselbloem (Netherlands & Eurozone Group President) have been included in exhibitions in those countries. Curran activates the popular graphic representation of such circumstance through a 3D visualisation/virtualisation of the algorithmically-generated soundscape—The Economy Of Appearances—to represent contemporary financial capital functioning through the conduit of the financialised nation state.

Financial Surrealism (WTC), Zuidas Financial District, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2015, (A4 double-sided colour print) (text on reverse)

Financial Surrealism (WTC)
Zuidas Financial District, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2015
(A4 double-sided colour print)
(text on reverse)

…in the case of the Netherlands, most of the Dutch shadow banking sector…is set-up by corporations for tax purposes, to attract external funding and to facilitate intragroup transactions…the focus of the shadow banking entities located in Ireland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands is the euro area, or even global.

While the relative importance of the euro area shadow banking sector has risen significantly since 2007, it remains smaller than the regulated banking system. Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and Ireland are the exception: the shadow banking sector assets in these three countries are substantially larger than those of the regulated banking system, accounting for almost two-thirds of the entire euro area shadow banking system. Credit through non-bank channels can have important advantages and contributes to the financing of the real economy, but can also become a source of systemic risk…

(source Banking Structures Report (2008-2013), European Central Bank, October 2014)

Shadow Banking

Many financial institutions that act like banks are not supervised like banks. The term, shadow bank was coined by U.S. economist Paul McCulley in 2007…because they are not subject to traditional bank regulation…they are in the shadows.

They are characterized by lack of disclosure and information about the value of their assets…opaque governance and ownership structures between banks and shadow banks; little regulatory or supervisory oversight…

Shadows can be frightening because they obscure the shapes and sizes of objects within them. The same is true for shadow banks. Estimating the size of the shadow banking system is particularly difficult because many of its entities do not report to government regulators. The shadow banking system appears to be largest in the United States, but nonbank credit intermediation is present in other countries—and growing. The shadow banking system’s share of total global financial intermediation was about 25 percent in 2009.

(source Finance & Development, International Monetary Fund, June 2013 Vol. 50 No.2)

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Portrait (Child) from series Stoneybatter (Dublin) August 1998

Text Helen Carey

Algorithm & Sound Composition: Ken Curran
3D Data Visualisation: Damien Byrne
Film Editor: Lidia Rossner
Film script adapted by Mark Curran from original essay by Brett Scott
Voice: Claudia Schäfer

Thanks to Arts Council Ireland, Noorderlicht Photography, NEPN (University of Sunderland), Institute of Art, Design & Technology (IADT), Belfast Exposed Photography Gallery, Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Gallery of Photography & Culture Ireland

Mark Curran The Economy of Appearances
4 September–30 October 2015
Opening: Thursday, 3 September
Limerick City Gallery of Art
Carnegie Building
Pery Square
Limerick
Ireland
gallery.limerick.ie

Full information here.

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